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niversity of Connecticut 
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Andrew Wyeth: dry brush and pencil 



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A LOAN EXHIBITION ORGANIZED BY THE FOGG ART MUSEUM 1963 



ANDREW WYETH Dry Brush and Pencil Drawings 



FOGG ART MUSEUM HARVARD UNIVERSITY CAMBRIDGE MASSACHUSETTS 

THE PIERPONT MORGAN LIBRARY NEW YORK NEW YORK 

THE CORCORAN GALLERY OF ART WASHINGTON D.C. 

WILLIAM A. FARNSWORTH LIBRARY AND ART MUSEUM ROCKLAND MAINE 



DISTRIBUTED BY NEW YORK GRAPHIC SOCIETY, GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 



Lenders to the Exhibition 




WILLIAM A. FARNSWORTH LIBRARY AND ART MUSEUM, Rockland, Maine 

DR. MARGARET I. HANDY, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 

MR. T. EDWARD HANLEY, Bradford, Pennsylvania 

MR. AND MRS. HARRY G. HASKELL, JR., Wilmington, Delaware 

DR. AND MRS. MYRON A. HOFER, II, Washington, D.C. 

MR. AND MRS. PHILIP HOFER, Cambridge, Massachusetts 

MRS. FREDERICK H. LASSITER, New York, New York 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT MONTGOMERY, New York, New York 

MR. AND MRS. W. E. PHELPS, Montchanin, Delaware 

PRIVATE COLLECTION, New York, New York 

MR. AND MRS. HENRY SALTONSTALL, Exeter, New Hampshire 

MR. AND MRS. HAROLD S. SCHUTT, JR., Wilmington, Delaware 

MR. AND MRS. R. L. B. TOBIN, San Antonio, Texas 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE WEYMOUTH, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 

MRS. ANDREW WYETH, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 



©Copyright 1963 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College 



Acknowledgments 






We wish to express our great appreciation to all the lenders 
for their generosity in parting with their drawings and drv 
brush sketches by Andrew Wyeth for the duration of this 
exhibition. Without their co-operation in all matters this 
undertaking would not have been possible. Our especial 
thanks go to Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Wyeth for their invalu- 
able assistance, not only in the selection and dating of works 
to be exhibited, but also in acquainting us with the circum- 
stances connected with the creation of these works. We pay 
particular thanks to Mr. W. E. Phelps for his thoughtfulness 
in bringing to our attention the illustrated letters of Andrew 
Wyeth, and to Mr. Helmut Ripperger of M. Knoedler and 
Company, New York Citv for his help in providing biblio- 
graphical material. 

For their assistance in compiling this catalogue we wish to 
thank Mrs. Grafton Wilson and Mrs. Warren C. Moffett. 
Miss Emily Rauh of the Fogg Museum and Miss Eleanor 
Garvey of Houghton Library designed the catalogue entries. 

A.M. 

This catalogue was completed before the catalogue of the 
Andrew Wyeth Exhibition at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in 
Buffalo, November 2-December 9, 1962, was available. Thus no 
reference to its entries could be included. 



In the finished tempera paintings of so thoughtful an artist 
as Andrew Wyeth, there is bound to be some loss of the im- 
mediacy which is such an outstanding characteristic of his 
dashing watercolors. A painter cannot always invent directly 
on his canvas or panel. Quick sketches and working drawings 
are often a necessary preliminary. The pit}' is that students 
and the public so rarely see them. Because of their intimate 
FOYCWOYu nature and unfinished state, the artist almost invariably 

hides them away, or— even more regrettablv— destroys them. 
But they can be of the utmost beauty and importance as is 
evidenced by the Leonardo da Vinci cartoon long owned bv 
the Royal Academy, Burlington House, London, over which 
there has been so much excitement in recent months. 

For a number of reasons, therefore, the writer of this note 
was particularly pleased when Mr. Wyeth expressed his will- 
ingness to allow a considerable showing of his watercolor 
sketches, as well as a number of pencil drawings, because, 
with few exceptions, they have never been exhibited before. 
By far the largest proportion of them are in Mrs. Wyeth's 
personal collection. 

Here, at last, can be adequately seen a very significant 
facet of the artist's genius: the connecting link between his 
watercolors and his paintings. 

PHILIP HOFER 

Curator of Printing and Graphic 
Arts, Hanard College Library 
June 1, 1962 Secretary, Fogg Art Museum 



IfltVOuUCtiOH ^ succession of exhibitions since his first, at the age of 

twenty, in 1937, and the generous reproduction of his work 
in color as well as black and white, has acquainted a wide 
audience with the tempera paintings of Andrew Wyeth. 
The almost haunting suggestion of drama evoked by his 
representations of seemingly naturalistic scenes, such as 
Christinas World (see number 3), and the changing moods 
of winds and seasons, recorded in the sombre vet dashing 
watercolors, have awakened responsive chords of under- 
standing throughout the country. More than once the artist 
has described to sympathetic interviewers his manner of 
procedure, from the first idea to the finished picture. Yet, as 
Mr. Hofer points out, this is the first time that an exhibition 
has been devoted not to the temperas and watercolors but 
to his preparatory studies, both those in pencil and those 
that he calls "dry brush." 

That the gifted son and pupil of the noted illustrator and 
painter, N. C. Wyeth, should be an accomplished draughts- 
man is not surprising. The elder Wyeth, his son has said, be- 
lieved in "sound drawing." He was highly critical of his 
pupil's work. The voung artist, whose health for many years 
was not robust and who for this reason remained near paren- 
tal tutelage, profited from the stern discipline. As a result, he 
found himself, when still a young man, equipped with a tool 
ready to record with speed and exactitude, sometimes in the 
quickest of notations, ideas, scenes, or details which once 
recorded he could contemplate, analyze, or even reject, as 



plans for a picture evolved. His pencil drawings are gen- 
erally details that will find a place in the whole. The dry 
brush technique carries plans beyond the quick watercolor 
sketches. They are a step nearer the finished work. Since the 
tempera technique is, by its very nature, a slow and exacting 
one, the helpfulness to the artist of the intermediate step is 
clear. Manv changes in tone, mood, and details can and 
often do take place between the dry brush and the painting. 
Since they have been steps on the road to another goal, the 
artist and his wife have often kept them. 

As its name suggests, the dry brush technique is neither as 
quick nor as fluid as watercolor. The color itself is more 
dense, vet never so heavy as to lose all translucency. 

To show the steps through which Wyeth's paintings have 
evolved, we have reversed the usual order of catalogues. 
Generally drawings and studies are listed after the more 
completed works. In this instance, it seemed more reason- 
able to place them in the order in which they were done. In 
one case a dry brush drawing is itself the completed work: 
The Young Bull (number 67). Of this subject, there is no 
tempera painting. One of the artist's most recent works, it is 
also one of his most fascinating— and the manner in which 
it came into being contains so many steps and elements 
characteristic of his procedure that it can serve as an illumi- 
nating example of his particular and personal creative 
method. 

First of all, the setting is one familiar to him in many sea- 
sons and in many lights: the house, hill, and wall of his 
neighbor, the German farmer, Karl Kuerner. We know from 
a letter to his friend and neighbor, Mr. Phelps, written in 
January 1957 (sec number 38), how, walking early one win- 



ter morning, he saw the pale winter light strike the upper 
story of the square white house, and, going nearer, he saw 
the ropes and chains which the farmer used when slaughter- 
ing his hogs. The two events made such a sudden and deep 
impression that he made a detailed pencil sketch of the fork 
of the beech tree with its rope and chains and enclosed 
it in a letter which not only described the walk and the 
morning but illustrated, in tones from golden through mus- 
tard to dark bistre, on the letter's first page, how the scene 
had looked. The artist returned another day to find the 
young brown Swiss bull near the wall, held by his owner. 
Sketch after sketch followed. It was not until three years 
later that the dry brush was considered finished. The early 
morning winter light was still striking the white house above 
the shadows, but the farmer and even the suggestion of 
chains had been eliminated. The young bull now stands in 
profile in transparent shadow, facing the coming day, the 
shadows of his ears and legs, long echoing parallels to the 
shadow on the wall. 

It was in that letter of January 1957 that the artist wrote: 
"This is my time of year." One sees and one feels his excite- 
ment in the first sketch as he walks the beloved, familiar 
hills, noting the dry grass, the lowering clouds, the drift of 
snow, the flight of birds. But one suspects that each season is 
his, as its eternal changes unfold. His is a countryman's 
trained eye, but his is also the artist's sensibility. He knows 
every shift of wind and alteration of weather, whether in 
Chadds Ford where he was born and grew up or in the Penob- 
scot region of Maine where he passes long summers. And so 
sure is his knowledge and his touch that one feels the draw- 
ing in of winter, the heaviness of March snow, the thinness 



of February sunlight, the miracle of Quaker Ladies flower- 
ing as one watches— or senses the damp of Maine fog, the 
exhilaration of a northwest wind, or the still clarity of an 
autumn morning. 

If, in general, the settings are nature's, the latent dramas 
are man's— forlorn, ancient houses looking out with blind 
eyes, each seeming to enclose the setting of some sad story; 
and abandoned implements— wagons, weights, a measure, 
useless without man's directing hand. Occasionally there is 
the evidence of what that directing hand accomplished, such 
as the dead deer swinging stiffly like a gallow's frozen corpse 
in the winter wind. The body can give its evidence without 
its presence as obviously as has the invisible hand— Horace s 
Coat (number 34) with its frayed edges and worn curves is, 
in a sense, a portrait of the man whose shape it has taken, as 
are That Gentleman s slippers's (see numbers 49 and 55). 
The empty bed (number 36) with the invalid's needments 
at hand is as eloquent as the painting with its frail occupant. 
The Boots (number 9) bearing down on the weeds beneath 
come forward with an inexorable finality, like Death itself. 

Those who speak of "realism" and "photographic ac- 
curacy" have been misled by the artist's success in creating 
the image he sought. They have overlooked or not suspected 
the suppression of some details, the marked emphasis of 
others, the widening out or narrowing down of space, and 
the always careful adjustment of light. How all-important 
this role of light and shadow is, is immediately clear in the 
pencil drawings and in the dry brush studies, whether 
subtle, as in its play over the surge of Kuernefs Hill ( num- 
ber 2), or delicate yet precise as in Winter Bees (number 
54) and Vinal's Point (number 62), or strong and power- 



fully suggestive as in the Olson Farm (number 4) or the 
study of the oil drum (number 31). It is this acutely ob- 
served and recorded angle of light that gives the sense of an 
exact moment of vibrating time. 

In the drawings one can see the artist sharpening the 
drama, even changing the seasons. Sometimes he manipu- 
lates the various factors so that there is an almost eerie 
quality, as in Teel's Island (number 25) . Following his steps 
from the moment in June when his boat crunches onto the 
shore of that abandoned, silent spot, with a Northern sea 
all about it and sparkling air above, until he withdraws in 
the autumn, his last touch added to the drying grass, we, 
too, come to know how charged with a variety of emotions 
every scene is. The artist has known the people, their his- 
tories, their possessions, and their setting. Their lives have 
touched responsive springs in his being— from that re- 
sponse has come his power to move us. Inanimate objects— 
an abandoned oar, an empty crab shell, an abandoned 
house— are vivid with a symbolism no less valid for its seem- 
ing simplicity. 

When he was young, every clump of dried grass, even 
leaf, was separately studied, but he found that in pulling his 
composition together he lost a certain immediacy. Some of 
his own first excitement failed to carry over. Today the 
studies he makes are less meticulous, less finely detailed. 
They have grown in sweep and authority. The speed of 
some, such as that which gives the whole composition of 
what will be The Young Bull (number 66), shows Wyeth 
following the same procedure as that followed by some not- 
able artists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries 
whom one would not have thought of as his forebears, and 



whom he. who has refused all foreign travel, would not 
claim. 

As is true of even" real artist, his preference and use of 
color is deeply personal, again often with SMnbolic over- 
tones. He loves the colors of dry grass and of fresh green 
. and the russets of autumn leaves, "the dustv beautv" 
of a winter beehive, olive-greens and mustardv vellows. the 
contrast of silvery and golden tones, and over and over a 
note, or more than a note, of blue: the faded, worn blue of 
an old denim coat a blue measure, a blue scale, a blue mus- 
sel shell, a patch of blue water, a bit of blue skv. a box or two 
of blueberr: ; 

In the best sense of the word. Andrew Wveth is a regional 
artist for the he draws and paints are chosen from the 

two regions he knows and loves so well. But in the last anal- 
:he drawings and paintings are no more regional than 
the seasons themselves and the effects these seasons have on 
the lives of those who live in and through them. 

AGNES MONGAN 

istant Director and Curator 
of Drawings. Fogg Art Museum 



Catalog 



ue 



1 GRASSES 

A clump of dried weeds and grasses and a dry leaf, painted 
just as the artist found it in a winter field. 

Dry brush in tones of yellow and brown 
17 x 21 Vi inches 
Date: Autumn 1941 

This drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera Winter 
Fields in the Collection of Mrs. Josiah Marvel, Greenville, 
Delaware (reproduced: Art News, vol. xlii, Mar. 1-14, 
1943, p. 20). For the tempera, one of his early paintings in 
that medium, the artist made very complete preparatory 
studies, of which this is one in dry brush. 



LENT BY MARGARET I. HANDY 



2 KUERNER'S HILL 



ILLUSTRATED 



In the middle distance is the gentle slope of a grassy hill, its 
green-gray grass marked by cart tracks. From the left a path 
bordered by a fence passes at an angle inward towards the 
right beyond a dead tree and up the hill towards a copse of 
leafless trees. The foreground is blank but a figure is lightly 
sketched in pencil at the beginning of the path at the left. 

Pencil and dry brush in tones of gray, gray-green, and sand color 

22 X 44 inches (sight) 

Inscribed and signed at lower right: to Joseph Hergesheimer/with deepest 

regards/Andy Wyeth 
Date: November 1945 

The drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera paint- 
ing, Winter, 1946, in the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John 



MacDonald, Cambridge, Massachusetts. The tempera was 
finished by March, 1946, and is the first picture which 
Wyeth painted after his father's death (reproduced: Art 
Digest, vol. xxi, Oct. 1946, p. 10). N. C. Wyeth, muralist, 
illustrator, and teacher (1882-1945), was killed in an auto- 
mobile accident at a railroad crossing the other side of 
Kuerner's Hill. The hill is one he used to sit on, as he con- 
templated the landscape. The same hill, seen from another 
direction, appears in the background of Young Bull ( num- 
ber 67 ) . 



LENT BY MR. AND MRS. R. L. B. TOBIN 



3 CHRISTINA OLSON 



She sits on the ground, facing inward, her hair loosely 
pinned and blowing in the wind. 

Pencil on white paper 
14V2 X 20Y2 inches (sight) 
Date: Summer 1948 

The drawing is a preparatory study for the figure in the fore- 
ground of Christinas World, Museum of Modern Art, New 
York (reproduced: Art News, vol. xlii, Mar. 1-14, 1943, P- 
16) . Christina, a summer neighbor of the Wyeths' in Cush- 
ing, Maine, was crippled by infantile paralysis. Wyeth came 
upon her one day near the family burying ground looking at 
her house from the wide field in front of it. From the mem- 
ory of this incident he developed the tempera painting. He 
also painted her in 1947 sea ted on the threshold of her open 
doorway (tempera, Christina Olson, Collection of Mr. and 



Mrs. Joseph Verner Reed; reproduced: Ten Color Repro- 
ductions of Paintings by Andrew Wyeth, Triton Press, New 
York, 1956, no. 1 ), and again in 1952 (tempera, Miss Olson, 
Collection of Mr. John D. Rockefeller) . 



5 WINTER CORN 



ILLUSTRATED 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



4 OLSON FARM 



ILLUSTRATED 



The three-story, clapboard farmhouse with its steep, 
shingled roof crowned by two slim chimneys above two 
dormer windows, stands unadorned at the edge of a field. 
Sunlight strikes it obliquely from the right. A ladder leading 
to the front gutter partially blocks the front door; it is joined 
by another which lies against the roof and leads to the left 
chimney. At the right, adjoining the house, are an ell and 
two sheds. 

Pencil 

16 14 X 21% inches 

Date: Summer 1948 

The drawing is a preliminary study for the farmhouse which 
appears at the upper right of the painting, Christinas 
World, Museum of Modern Art, New York ( see number 3 ) . 
Wyeth has told how he came to do the painting. Here, even 
without the figure, one feels the mood of loneliness which 
is really the subject of the picture. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



At the left, a dry cornstalk with a cob of corn, its yellow 
kernels visible beneath its dry, curled husk, dangles from the 
stalk. Behind it a partial view of the winter field with other 
stalks still standing on their hillocks. At the right, a single 
tall stalk with a bent top and a single hanging ear of corn; 
two smaller stalks with their dried tassel tops behind it to 
the left. 

Dry brush drawing in tones of gray, brown, yellow, and red 

31 x 40 Vi inches 

Signed in ink at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: Autumn 1948 

Exhibitions: Paintings and Drawings by Andrew Wyeth, Currier Gallery, 

Manchester, New Hampshire, and the William Farnsworth Art Museum, 

Rockland, Maine, 1957, no. 67; Andrew Wyeth, Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1960, no. 13 

LENT BY DR. AND MRS. HENRY SALTONSTALL 



6 HANS HERR'S HOUSE 



ILLUSTRATED 



A pen and ink sketch, on letter paper, of an old stone house 
on a slight elevation with an indication of grass surrounding 
it and clouds above. Another sketch on another letter page 
of a large stone fireplace with an iron kettle hanging from a 
crane in the center. 



Pen and ink 

10V2 x 7 H inches: house 

Date: Winter 1948 



ioV4 X 7V4 inches: fireplace 






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In the winter of 1948 Wyeth was taken by his aunt, Mrs. 
Ralph Sargent, to the Christian Herr house, built by an 
early forebear of his mother's, on the outskirts of Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania. The house made such a profound impression 
upon him that he returned the following winter and did sev- 
eral watercolors of both the interior and the exterior. In- 
deed, the house seems to represent to the artist all the stone 
houses of Pennsylvania. The artist has always called the 
house the "Hans Herr House." 

Like numbers 11 and 21, these sketches are incorporated in 
an undated letter written by the artist to Mr. and Mrs. 
W. E. Phelps after one or the other of the visits to 
Lancaster: 

"Bill and Mary, I have found the most wonderful house 
near Lancaster, Pa. that will just send you crazy. It was built 
in 171 3 by Mr. Hans-Herr, a distant relation of my mother's. 
And what a house it is. Here is a rough sketch of something 
the way it looks— the building was built on a rock formation 
which makes the building seem as if it's part of the earth— 
"The stone wall breaks right out of the earth. . . . This 
fire place stands in the inside of the house and is the first 
thing that hits you as you come in the front door. The big 
oak beam across the fire place is a rich smokey color. An 
early letter written by Mr. Herr tells of his writing a letter in 
December 1740 with a snow storm raging outdoors. The 
only light is from this fire place— and he states in a very in- 
teresting way 'that the room was filled with Thirty Indians 
which made the room smell of bear grease which they 
rubbed themselves with to keep warm'— Can't you picture 
this wonderful scene." 



7 MARGARET HANDY 

A half-length figure, she stands with her back to the 
spectator. 

Pencil 

gVs X ioYs inches 

Date: Winter 1949 

Exhibition: Wilmington, Delaware, Society of the Fine Arts, 1957, no. 61 

The drawing is a preparatory study for the figure of Dr. 
Handy in the tempera painting in her own collection, Chil- 
dren s Doctor (reproduced: Arf News, vol. xlii, Mar. 1-14, 
1943, P- 1 7)- D f - Handy, a close neighbor and valued friend 
of the Wyeths', and for many years the doctor for their 
children. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



8 LIGHTNING ROD 



ILLUSTRATED 



LENT BY MR. AND MRS. W. E. PHELPS 



The sharplv pointed rod, which pierces a small shining 
globe, is attached to the peak of a shingled roof. Sharp sun- 
light casts its shadow on the shingles at the left. Beyond is 
the curving shore of a rocky cove. 

Pencil on white paper 

22 x 14% inches 

Inscribed at the lower right by the artist: Sky and water quite down in key/ 

small glint on lightning rod globe brightest/spot/roof down deep in key/ 

A.W. 

Date: August 1950 






The drawing is a preliminary study for the tempera painting, 
Northern Point, Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connec- 
ticut, a painting which shows no more of Henry Teel's house 
than does the drawing, although in the painting the space at 
the right has been eliminated to make a more emphatic 
vertical composition (see Ten Color Reproductions of Paint- 
ings by Andrew Wyeth, Triton Press, New York, 1956, no. 
2 ) . The painting receives its name because the peak of the 
roof faces north. In the summer of 1950 the artist "climbed 
onto the roof of the two hundred year old Teel house to see 
the stretch of sea and islands beyond. The weathered decay 
of the black shingles in contrast to the smokey blue day and 
the amber light in the lightning rod excited me, so I painted 
Northern Point in the studio after making many pencil and 
water color studies on the spot." (Quoted Wadsworth 
Atheneum Bulletin, Ilnd series, no. 24, May-Sept. 1951, p. 
2, painting reproduced same page). The lightning rod and 
globe appear again in numbers 21, 22, and 25. 



Pencil on white paper 

io%6 x 13% inches 

Signed in pencil at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: February 1951 

The drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera painting. 
Trodden Weed, collection of Mrs. Andrew Wyeth (repro- 
duced and discussed by Henry McBride, "All Quiet on the 
Whitney Front," Art News, Dec. 1951, p. 19 ff.) . The boots 
are Wyeth's own, a Christmas present from his wife in 1950. 
They had belonged to Howard Pyle who had used them in 
his illustrations, but they fitted Andrew Wyeth and he wore 
them as he trudged about the Chadds Ford countrvside 
convalescing from a very serious operation. In a letter to the 
editor of Art News (May 1952, p. 6), the artist tells how he 
came to draw and paint the boots. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



LENT BY MR. AND MRS. PHILIP HOFER 



9 BOOTS 



ILLUSTRATED 



A figure, seen only from beneath the edge of a lightly indi- 
cated cloak which falls below the knees, advances toward the 
viewer. The soft, high boots, like those of a seventeenth- 
century cavalier, dominate the otherwise empty page. 



10 JAMIE ILLUSTRATED 

A sketch on letter paper of a boy in a fur collared coat and a 
coonskin cap in profile to the left. 

Pen and ink and watercolor 
ro 1 ^ x 7 l A inches 
Date: January 1952 

This page is from a letter to the artist's good friends, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. E. Phelps, written just after Christmas of 
1951. The sketch shows the artist's son, Jamie, wearing the 






coonskin hat sent to him by the Phelpses, and which he 
wears also in the dry brush drawing, Faraway, number 1 1 . A 
part of the letter is as follows: 

"Jamie just came in the studio after being out on the hill 
sledding. He looked so perfect in your coon hat that I had to 
make this sketch for you. What a wonderful gift— nothing 
could please him more." 



LENT BY MR. AND MRS. W. E. PHELPS 



11 FARAWAY 



ILLUSTRATED 



With a dreamy expression on his face, a young boy sits on 
the slope of a hill surrounded by dried tampa grass and 
stalks of dried Queen Ann's lace with a leafless cherry sap- 
ling at the upper left and a pale sky showing at the upper 
edge. He wears a coonskin hat, a heavy child's navy coat, 
and his hands are clasped about faded blue dungarees, below 
which show old-fashioned soft leather boots with brass 
tipped toes. 

Dry brush in pale greens, blues, tans, and browns 
13% X 20% inches (sight) 
Signed in ink at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 
Date: Early Spring 1952 

Exhibitions: Andrew Wyeth, Macbeth Gallery, New York, November 6-29, 
1952, no. 5; Exhibition of Paintings by Andrew Wyeth, M. Knoedler and 
Co., New York, October 26-November 14, 1953, no. 37; Four Americans 
from the Real to the Abstract, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas, 
January 10-February 11, 1954, no. 9; Third Annual Exhibition, Museum of 
Art of Ogunquit, Maine, July l-September 11, 1955, no. 13, reproduced; 
Andrew Wyeth, M. II. De Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, July 12-August 12, 1956, and Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa 



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April : Vihaington. Delaware. Society of the Fine Arts 1957 no. 51 

Reproduced: Aline B. Loochbenn. ""Wyetb— Conserratiwe Avant-Gardi>t.~ 
The Sew Yott Tones .\fagcne. Octob. r : Children's Bool 

Section. The Srm Todk Tones Bool: Review. Norember 14. 1Q54- p. 1: 
lioyd Goodrich. "Andrew Wyeth. T.-nerieH. October 1955 7 :: 

7-:- r 'R.r- J-:-: - - 7--.:—.z : -----,' ""' -~ 7r.: :r. Pre-. N;- 
Yotk. i;c6. no. 5: Calrndjr of Events, January 5-Febraar - 1 : :-. The 
Wumington Sodetr of the Fine Arts. Delaware Art Center, on the oner 
Mentioned: Gene Bockley. -Ognnquit: Andrew Wyetb." The Boston San- 
dbrGlobe.Jnh 17 

Jamie, the artist's Younger son. had lost a small lead knight 
one dav when out walking with his father. The} retraced 
their steps to look for it but without success. As he was 
walking back down the hill, the artist turned and saw his 
son sitting on the hillside, lost in his dreams. Jamie was 
wearing a Daw Crockett hat that had been given to him the 
Christmas before bv the Wveths' friend and neighbor. Mr. 
W. E. Phelps see numr : : : He was proud of his metal 
tipped shoes because he had been told they were of a kind 
worn by bovs during the Civil War. The lost knight never 



1 MILK PAILS 

: milk pails of galvanized tin are placed side by side. 

■ - - - 

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The drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera painting 
Cooling Shed in the Collection of Mrs. Josiah Marvel. 
Greenville. Delaware. In the painting the pails are upside 
down on the stone rim of the spring trough see Ten Color 
Reproductions of Paintings bx Andrew Wveth. Triton Press, 
New York. iQ56. no. 9 ) . 



LEST 5V MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



: : ARCHIE'S CORNER 



ILLUSTRATED 



In the left middle distance, lit bv a pale winter light from 
the right, a small stone house, its roof gone, is falling to ruin. 
A row of bare trees and shrubs stretches out in a thin line 
across the middle of the page. Bevond it rises a bare hill. 
marked by a fence leading from the upper right over the 
brow of the hill in the middle. Bare trees, shrubs and fence 
posts are silhouetted against the sky and in the far distance 
is the curve of another hill. 



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lower right: Andrew Wyeth 



The drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera paint- 
ing Snou Flurries in the Collection of Dr. Margaret Handy. 
The house held a particular fascination for the artist be- 
cause when he was young it had been occupied by an old 
man who had an iron hook for an arm. 



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14 FLOCK OF CROWS 



ILLUSTRATED 



16 SEA SHELLS 



ILLUSTRATED 



The hill is the same one represented in the preceding draw- 
ing (number 13), but here seen closer up. The distant hill 
of the preceding drawing is here covered with snow. The 
flock of crows are flying and feeding on the hilltop at the 
right. 

Drv brush in tones of brown and gray 

9%6 x 19V& inches (sight) 

Signed in pencil at lower right edge: Andrew W. 

Date: January 1953 

Exhibition: Wilmington, Delaware, Society of the Fine Arts, 1957, no. 59 

Like number 13 this dry brush drawing is also a study for 
Snow Flurries. It was made a little later in the year when 
the snow had already begun to cover the distant hill. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



Various mussel shells and bits of seaweed are scattered 
across the page, just as they were seen on the sandy shore. 

Dry brush in tones of black, blue, gray, and hrown 

11% X 15% inches (sight) 

Signed in ink at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: June 1953 

Exhibition: Wilmington, Delaware, Society of the Fine Arts, 1957, no. 55 

Like number 15 this also is a preparatory study for Sand 
Spit in the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Beebe, Blue 
Hill, Maine. The artist was fascinated by the colors of the 
shells, which vary from an "almost Egyptian blue" to shiny 
black, and by their crisp, sharp edges. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



15 GEORGES RIVER PINES 



ILLUSTRATED 



A dense wood of pines and spruce, rising above the fore- 
ground sand-spit, is silhouetted against the sky, occupying 
three quarters of the page to the right. At the left, low on the 
horizon, is a strip of green and some smaller pine. 

Dry brush in various greens and browns 

9% X 14% inches 

Signed in crayon at the lower right: Andy Wyeth 

Date: June 1953 

This dry brush drawing is a preparatory study for the tem- 
pera painting Sand Spit in the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. 
Marcus Beebe of Blue Hill, Maine. 



17 EAST FRIENDSHIP 

In the middle distance, on the low ledges of a flat blueberry 
country, is the abandoned old meeting house, an echoing 
emptiness of sky and distance around it. 

Pencil on white paper 

11Y4 X 1 5^4 inches (sight) 

Inscribed in pencil at lower right: East Friendship Baptist/A.W. 

Date: Summer 1953 

This building is now destroyed. 



LENT BY DR. AND MRS. MYRON IIOFER 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



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18 UNDER WATER 

Looking down through clear water through which light 
plays, one sees a large buttonwood leaf lying on the bottom. 
Dark shadows cast by the light from the right emphasize its 
sharp edges. Small fish are swimming by in the upper center 
of the picture. 

Pencil on white paper 
13V2 X 21V2 inches (sight) 
Date: Autumn 1953 

The artist, who made this study at Chadds Ford, had a paint- 
ing in mind at the time, but the interruption of a hunt and 
then a sudden flood, which changed the course of the brook, 
banished the original mood and the painting never evolved. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



19 CREEK BED 

Like the preceding drawing, this one also is a view through 
water, alive with little minnows and their shadows and the 
buttonwood leaves lying on the stream's bottom. 

Pencil on white paper 
13% X 20 inches (sight) 
Date: Autumn 1953 

See number 18. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



20 THE CORNER 



ILLUSTRATED 



Looking down a snowy hillside one sees, nestling into the 
side of a hollow, a low white stone building with an octag- 



onal roof, a chimney at the left and one at the right, a lad- 
der lying at a careless angle on the roof at the left, bean 
poles stacked against the roof's edge further to the left. Be- 
hind the first building is a dark clapboard house with bare 
trees around it. Beyond, the ground rises to the snowy field's 
edge bounded near the top by fence posts. A gray winter sky 
hangs over the lonely landscape. 

Dry brush in gray and brown with red accents in the brick chimney and a 

line of pinkish red brick at the edge of roof and wall 

1 3 Vz X 2 1 Vi inches 

Signed in pencil at the lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: December 1953 

Exhibition: Wilmington, Delaware, Society of the Fine Arts, 1957, no. 49 

Reproduced: Art in America, vol. l, no. 2, Summer, 1962, in color, p. 45 

The building, now destroyed, was originally an octagonal 
Quaker schoolhouse. It was later taken over by the Negroes 
and became known as Mother Archie's Church, named for 
its beloved preacher. It had fallen into disuse when in 1945 
the artist painted its interior, with cracked walls and ceiling. 
a broken lamp, and a flying pigeon (tempera, Mother 
Archie s, Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massa- 
chusetts; reproduced: Art in America, vol. xliii, Oct. 1955, 
p. 12). The hill beyond is the same hill shown in Flock of 
Crows, number 14 and Archie's Corner, number 1 3. 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. W. E. PHELPS 



21 SKETCHES OF TEEL'S ISLAND 



ILLUSTRATED 



Two quick sketches of the abandoned Teel house, one of a 
flatiron rigged on a rope serving as a lock for the kitchen 
door, and one of the kitchen and the black range. 



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Pen and ink and watercolor 
10% X y% 6 inches 
Date: June 19, 1954 

Like numbers 6 and 10, these sketches also come from a let- 
ter from Andrew Wyeth to his friend, Mr. W. E. Phelps. 
This one, dated June 19, 1954, from Cushing, Maine, runs 
in part as follows: 

". . . This morning I took my boat and went down the 
Georges' River to Teel's Island. It was one of those beautiful 
clear Maine spring days with a light breeze blowing from 
the West. As I approached the island I noticed that Henry 
was still living at Port Clyde. He has been ill this winter and 
is still feeling weak from his illness. The island was alone . . . 
the only sound as I landed on the beach was the breaking of 
the water from the wake of my boat. I could see the Teel 
house just above the grass at the edge of the beach. As I 
walked up the path which goes over ledges as well as ground 
I could see that it had not been used much of late. Then I 
came to the kitchen door which had this wonderful arrange- 
ment for a lock. First view of kitchen as I opened the door 
(under kitchen sketch). The smell of this house is all of 
New England to me . . . the blue of this wood box and the 
black wood stove. I have plans to spend a lot of time on 
this island this summer." 

LF.NT BY MR. AND MRS. W. E. PHELPS 

22 TEEL'S HOUSE 

The house is seen at an angle across a field, the lightning rod 
(number 8) at the upper right. There is a quick sketch of a 
crab in the left foreground. 



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21 



Pencil 

16 X 23 inches (sight) 
Date: July 1954 

Henry Ted, because of ill health, had been removed to the 
mainland. But in the summer of 1954 the artist returned to 
the island to sketch the abandoned house which had be- 
longed to the Teel family for two centuries (see also num- 
bers 8, 21, 23, 24, and 25). In 1945 Wyeth had painted a 
portrait of Henry Teel dressed in his workaday clothes, a 
cap on his head, seated in his spare kitchen, resting his left 
arm on the sill of an open window through which the clear 
light falls (Henry Teel, Collection of Paul E. Geier, Rome, 
Italy; reproduced: Catalogue of Paintings and Drawings by 
Andrew Wyeth, Currier Gallery, Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, and Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine, Sum- 
mer 1951, no. 7). Henry Teel died in the spring of 1955. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



24 OAR 

The abandoned oar, its leather hand guard worn and frayed, 
lies on the sloping shore of Teel's Island; around it, empty 
crab shells. 

Lithographic cravon 
14V2 x 23 inches (sight) 
Date: July 1954 

A drawing of the dory to which this oar belonged is in the 
Currier Gallery, Manchester, New Hampshire. The Currier 
drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera painting 
Spindrift, also owned by the Currier Gallery. (Tempera re- 
produced: Catalogue of Paintings and Drawings by Andrew 
Wyeth, Currier Gallery and Farnsworth Art Museum, Sum- 
mer 1951, no. 29). Like the previous drawings (numbers 22 
and 23) this one was also made on Wyeth's visit to the 
island during Henry Teel's illness. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



23 KITCHEN ELL 

The ell is the ell of Henry Teel's house. 

Dry brush in dark tones 
14 x 18 inches (sight) 
Date: July 1954 

This drawing was accidentally cut shortly after it was done, 
but was pasted together again. The drawing was made on the 
same visit to Teel's Island as that mentioned in number 22. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



25 TEEL'S ISLAND 



ILLUSTRATED 



A weather-beaten skiff, its painter wound around the for- 
ward thwart, is pulled up on the dry grass in the foreground. 
Beyond it over the brow of the slight rise, nestling between 
rocks and bushes, is Henry Teel's house, its lightning rod 
and thin central chimney silhouetted against the pale skv. 

Dry brush in browns, russets, dull reds, soft greens, and gray 

9% x 22?4 inches 

Signed in ink at the lower left 

Date: September 1954 



25 




Exhibition: M. Knoedler and Company, New York, 1958, no. 38 
Reproduced: Art in America, vol. L, no. 2, Summer 1962, reproduced in 
color, p. 41 

The drawing gives the impression of the clear, dry, sparkling 
air of an early Maine autumn, which brightens the scenes 
and sharpens all edges. The skiff was always tied at the 
wharf, or at the boat mooring, if Henry Tccl was out haul- 
ing his lobster traps. Because of his illness, it had been 
pulled up above high water. By autumn Wyeth realized 
Henry would probably never use it again and so did this 
poignant dry brush. 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. ROBERT MONTGOMERY 



26 NORTH STAR BARN 

The barn, a large one of native stone, is shown in early 
morning light. A stone wall crosses the foreground. Do- 
mestic geese are walking away from the barn. Snow covers 
the ground and the roof of the barn. 

Dry brush 

15 x 22% inches (sight) 

Date: December 1954 

This is the first dry brush done by Wyeth in the state of 
Delaware. 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. HAROLD S. SCHUTT, JR. 



27 CORN 

A study of the dry stalks with their dried tassels, of the corn 
husks and of seed pods. 



Pencil 

13V2 X 20V2 inches (sight) 

Date: Autumn 1955 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYI I II 



28 PREPARATORY STUDY FOR 
"ROASTED CHESTNUTS" 

A young man stands near his improvised chestnut brazier 
looking attentively towards the highway at the right. 

Watercolor 

131/2 X 8V2 inches (sight) 

Inscribed in ink in artist's hand: "First color sketch" 

Date: November 1955 

Reproduced: Horizon, vol. l.Sept. 1958, in color, p. 112. 

This watercolor and numbers 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33 are all 
preparatory studies for the tempera painting Roasted Chest- 
nuts in the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Haskell, Jr., 
Wilmington, Delaware (reproduced in color: American 
Artist, vol. xxii, Nov. 1958, p. 31). Wveth began the pre- 
paratory drawings by November 1, 1955 and the tempera 
was completed by April 17, 1956. He went up to the road 
where the young man was selling roasted chestnuts and 
made many studies of the figure, the oil can, and even the 
bushes in the background. This watercolor, which the artist 
himself later inscribed, was very closely followed in the 
finished tempera; indeed, it has the same proportions as the 
finished picture. 

LENT BY' MR. AND MRS. HARRY G. HASKELL. JR. 



29 BOY STANDING 



ILLUSTRATED 




A half-length study of a young man in an old sergeant's 
jacket and black stocking cap in profile to the right. 

Charcoal 

22Y4 x i3%6 inches 

Date: November 1955 

This charcoal drawing is another preparatory study for the 
tempera painting Roasted Chestnuts. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



30 PREPARATORY STUDY FOR 
"ROASTED CHESTNUTS" 

The mason jar at the lower right was omitted in the tem- 
pera. The sergeant's stripes are still visible on the sleeve of 
the old army jacket which the youth wears. 

Pencil 

11 X 854 inches (sight) 

Signed in pencil at lower left: A. Wyeth 

Date: November 1955 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. HARRY G. HASKELL, JR. 



31 PREPARATORY STUDY FOR 
"ROASTED CHESTNUTS" 



ILLUSTRATED 



A detailed study of the empty, rusty oil drum and the alumi- 
num basin fitted into its top which had been made into a 
charcoal brazier, standing in a late afternoon light, its long 



29 



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31 




shadow falling to the right of it across the few tracks along 
the edge of the road. 

Pencil 

10% x 14I/2 inches 

Signed in pencil at lower right: A.W. 

Date: November 1955 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. HARRY G. HASKELL, JR. 



32 OSAGE ORANGE: PREPARATORY STUDY 
FOR "ROASTED CHESTNUTS" 

Bare branches of an Osage orange bush. 

Pencil 

14V2 X 10Y2 inches (sight) 

Date: November 1955 

In the tempera painting, the young man stands in front of a 
tangle of bare branches. The artist felt it was important to 
know the structure and texture of the bush, for its upper 
bare branches are silhouetted against the sky. 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. HARRY G. HASKELL, JR. 



33 



33 ALLAN: PREPARATORY STUDY FOR 

"ROASTED CHESTNUTS" illustrated 

Head and collar of a young man in profile to the right. 

Watercolor 

4 x %e x 4 lr /i6 inches. Reproduced actual size 

Date: November 1955 

Former Collection: Dr. Margaret I. Handy 

Exhibition: Wilmington, Delaware, Society of the Fine Arts, 1957, no. 63 



The watercolor shows just the head and collar of the young 
man, Allan Messersmith, the son of the local tinsmith of 
Chadds Ford. He is wearing a tight black stocking cap of the 
kind worn by sailors, and a double layer of emerald green 
collars, the collars of the two shirts which he wore for 
warmth under his old army jacket. Although he faces away 
from the light, his face is bright from the reflections from 
the snowy ground in front of him. The artist made many 
sketches of the eighteen-year-old youth as he stood by the 
side of the West Chester Road in the bitter cold of an early 
winter twilight. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



34 HORACE'S COAT 

Pencil 

11Y4 x 8Y 4 inches (sight) 

Date: January 1956 



This pencil study preceded the brush drawing, number 35. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



35 BLUE COAT 



ILLUSTRATED 



The worn, faded blue jacket hangs on a wooden hanger sus- 
pended from a simple nail in the white wall. 



Dry brush 

13% x io 1 ^ inches 

Date: January 1956 



The coat belonged to a neighbor, Horace Kipe, a retired en- 
gineer of the Pennsylvania Railroad. He had a service station 




ft 



and then a farm and used to pass by the Wyeths' carrying 
straw to his mule, wearing this worn and battered jacket. 
The artist wished to paint Horace's portrait, but death in- 
tervened. Wyeth then borrowed the coat from Horace 
Kipe's widow and hanging it on his own studio wall made 
this dry brush drawing. The warm material, the handsome 
quality of the blue, the soft folds, the brass buttons— and the 
associations with the man to whom it belonged— all appealed 
to him. Number 34, a pencil study, preceded this dry brush 
drawing. 



mother's last illness. The tempera painting was completed 
September 18, 1956. From the bed the invalid looked out to 
sea and the bright sea air filled her room. Near her she kept 
a basket with her Bible and the other books she was reading. 
In the tempera (reproduced: The Studio, vol. clvii, Apr. 
1959, p. 121) the view of the bed has been changed, the 
invalid sits up in bed, arms clasped around knees, looking 
out to sea. A wind stirs the net bed curtains and the shell, 
changed to a chambered nautilus, rests on a chest at the 
foot of the bed. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



36 THE BED 



ILLUSTRATED 



The covers are thrown back towards the foot of a handsome 
four-poster bed. Near the pillows at the head of the bed is a 
basket filled with books and an empty eyeglass case. On the 
floor to the right of the post near the center of the page is a 
large sea shell. 

Pencil 

i3 r /i6 x iqWie inches (sight) 

Date: June 1956 

Exhibition: Wilmington, Delaware, Society of the Fine Arts, 1957, no. 62 

Reproduced: Time, vol. 69 (Jan. 7, 1957), in color, p. 61. 

The drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera painting 
Chambered Nautilus in the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Montgomery, New York (reproduced: Alexander 
Eliot, Three Hundred Years of American Painting, New 
York, 1957, pp. 388-389). The drawings were begun 
in Maine by June 15, 1956, the summer of Mrs. Wyeth's 



37 FARM POND 

A narrow, dark pond in the foreground with fresh snow 
around it, a hill rising behind it to the right, a bare sapling in 
the middle distance. On the left above the pond is the 
farmhouse. 

Watercolor 
13V+ x 21 1/2 inches 
Date: November 1956 

Exhibitions: M. Knoedler and Company, New York, 1958, no. 16; Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., i960, no. 33 
Reproduced: Art News, vol. 57, Dec. 1958, p. 13. 

The watercolor is a preparatory study for the tempera 
Brown Swiss in the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
Laughlin, Locust Valley, New York (reproduced: The 
1958 Pittsburgh Bicentennial International Exhibition of 
Contemporary Painting and Sculpture, Carnegie Institute, 
PL 8, no. 483). The drawings were begun November 11, 
1956, and the tempera was completed May 15, 1957. The 



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artist, driving his jeep home in the winter twilight, turned 
and saw the dark pond surrounded by a fresh fall of snow. 
The water in the pond was still and gleaming, not yet 
frozen. He sketched the scene quickly in watcrcolor, to catch 
the damp, liquid quality of the water and the new snow be- 
fore the light faded. In the tempera there is no snow. This 
drawing was actually done from the bottom of Kuerner's 
Hill (number 2) looking across the road down onto the 
pond with Karl Kuerner's house looming above and reflected 
in the still water. The tempera painting is called Brown 
Swiss because that is the kind of cattle Kuerner owns and it 
is their tracks that mark the earth. The house is the same 
house that appears in Young Bull, number 67, and the 
study, number 64. 



LENT BY MRS. FREDERICK II. LASSITER 



38 ROPE AND CHAINS 



ILLUSTRATED 



The rope and chains are looped around the bare branches of 
a tree. 

Pencil 

17% X 23V2 inches (sight) 

Date: November 1956 

Like number 37, this also is a preparatory study for Brown 
Swiss, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Laughlin, Lo- 
cust Valley, New York. This detail appears at the extreme 
left of the tempera near the corner of the house. The chains 
are those which Karl Kuerner uses when he slaughters his 
pigs. Another drawing of the same branch with chains is in 
the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Phelps, Montchanin, 



Delaware. A letter of January 27, 1957, from the artist to 
Mr. Phelps reads in part as follows: 

"Things are at long last getting quiet again and I have been 
taking long walks over the winter hills. Just this morning I 
went over to Karl Kuerner's house . . . and as I walked up 
the lane by the house and toward the barn I noticed the 
rope and chain used for hanging the pig when Karl and his 
son butchered it a number of weeks ago. I thought of you, 
Bill, and how you would have been thrilled by this sight. 
"This is my time of year now and I spend all my time out in 
it. How I wish I could really get this down in paint." 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



39 PETER HURD 



The drawing shows just the head and an indication of the 
collar, the head facing in profile to the right. 

Pencil 

11 X 8V4 inches (sight) 

Date: January 1957 

The drawing is a portrait of Mr. Wyeth's brother-in-law, the 
artist Peter Hurd. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



40 HOUND 

The hound sits, chained, near the door of the mill. 

Dry drush 

14% X 22V2 inches (sight) 

Date: Autumn 1957 



Reproduced: The Studio, December i960, p. 206, in color 

Henry C. Pitz, in an article, "Andrew Wyeth" (American 
Artist, vol. xxii, Nov. 1958, pp. 27-29) reproduces three 
pencil sketches, one watercolor, and the tempera Raccoon. 
The artist was fascinated by the sad, damp-eyed hound sit- 
ting with such a thoughtful expression near the mill. The 
tempera painting, which was completed May 15, 1958, is in 
the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Haskell, Jr., Wil- 
mington, Delaware. The preparatory drawings were begun 
October 15, 1957. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



42 CHAIN RING 

Three detailed studies of the chain which holds the hound, 
the one at the left in pencil, the center one in dry brush in 
tones of brown and gold, the one at the right a shiny, silvery 
chain and ring. 

Dry brush and pencil 
13 x igVz inches (sight) 
Date: November 1957 

Like numbers 40 and 41, a preparatory study for Raccoon. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



41 BLUE TICK 

Two sketches of heads at lower left and middle right, a 
sketch of a body just left of center. At upper right another 
dog. 



43 ALVARO'S HAYRACK 



ILLUSTRATED 



blue black with ? brown towards nose Brown 



Pencil 

13 X 20 inches (sight) 
Inscribed with color notes: 
spot/running into black 
Date: November 1957 

Like number 40, this also is a preparatory study for Raccoon, 
although in the painting one sees only the body and hind 
quarters of the dog at the lower edge of the painting. Blue 
Tick is the name by which a hound with the coloring of this 
dog is known. 



The empty hayrack stands in the center middle distance 
near the shore, in brownish and olive green grass. Beyond it, 
under a silver gray sky, gleams the calm water of the mouth 
of the Georges River. A fog is drifting in from the sea at the 
right over the blue and slate-blue mass of Little Caldwell 
Island in the background. 

Dry brush 

8 Vi X 22 14 inches 

Signed in blue ink at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: September 1958 

Every year, after the hay is in, Alvaro, Christina Olson's 
brother (see number 3), leaves the hayrack to weather near 
the water. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



LENT BY THE WILLIAM A. FARNSWORTH LIBRARY AND ART MUSEUM 



43 



44 THE SLIP 



ILLUSTRATED 



The two-masted Chesapeake Bay "Bug-eye," pulled up for 
the winter in a slip at Rockland, looks as though it were 
afloat on a sea of tawny grass. The foresail is furled, and its 
halyards are still taut. The jibs and mainsail have been re- 
moved. There is a narrow light blue line near the gunwale 
and a feeling of gold under the bowsprit. A fog is drifting in 
from the right and beginning to blur the view of the long, 
low, gray sail loft in the background. 

Dry brush 

20 3 A X 29 inches (uneven across the bottom) 

Signed in black ink at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: Begun June 1958; set aside and completed September 1958 

Exhibition: M. Knoedler and Company, New York, 1958, no. 44 

The raking angle of the masts and the slight curve in the 
second mast appealed particularly to the artist. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



45 GERMAN SHEPHERD 



ILLUSTRATED 



At the lower left a German shepherd dog lies asleep in the 
sunlight coming through the window in the right back- 
ground. 

Pencil 

23V2 X 17 inches (sight) 

Date: January 1959 

The drawing is a preliminary study for the tempera painting 
Ground Hog Day, Philadelphia Museum of Art (repro- 
duced: Studio, vol. 160, Dec. i960, p. 209; in color: Horizon, 



vol. iv, no. 1, p. 92). In the painting the dog has been elim- 
inated and a white kitchen table, set with a knife, simple 
white plate, and cup and saucer moved into the corner in 
front of the window. The scene is in the kitchen of the Karl 
Kuerner farm. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 

46 PREPARATORY STUDY FOR 
"GROUND HOG DAY" 

The wall and window of the previous drawing, but here the 
angle of the viewer has changed and there are lemons and 
oranges on the window sill. 

Dry brush and pencil 
2z¥8 X 17 inches (sight) 
Date: January or February 1959 

Like number 45, this also is a preparatory drawing for 
Ground Hog Day. The kitchen is that of the house shown 
in the background of numbers 37 and 67, Karl Kuerner's 
farm. The cracked pane at the upper left remains in the 
painting, but the fruit disappears; the snow in the back- 
ground has melted, but the wire fence beyond the window 
remains and the light and shadows cast through the window 
on the wall at the left. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



47 ADAM 



ILLUSTRATED 



A close-up view in profile toward the right of the head of a 

Negro. 




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Pencil 

13% X 21 Vi inches (sight) 

Date: January 1959 

Adam Johnson, an elderly Negro, is a neighbor of the 
Wyeths' who works around the place in Chadds Ford. The 
artist was interested in the shape of his head and the humor 
of his facial expression. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



50 MARCH STORM 



ILLUSTRATED 



48 ETTA 



ILLUSTRATED 



The head in profile to the left of a Negro woman, a braid 
falling down her left cheek. 

Pencil 

13% X 21% inches (sight) 

Date: January 1959 

Etta is Adam's wife (see number 47) . 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



49 NEGRO HAND 



ILLUSTRATED 



A right hand, lying on the counterpane, the arm and reclin- 
ing figure lightly indicated. 

Pencil 

13% X 2i?4 inches (sight) 
Date: January 1959 

The hand is that of Tom Clark, the old Negro asleep in 
Garret Room ( number 72 ) . 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



From the dark interior of a barn, one looks through a half- 
opened barn door towards the storm which is filling the air 
with large flakes and piling heavy wet snow against the open 
door. 

Dry brush 

151^6 x io L yi 6 inches 

Date: March 1959 

As a boy, the artist used to rush to get his sled from the hav 
loft of the barn at the first snowfall. He remembered that 
early experience as he stood in the shadow of the barn and 
painted the dark, rich foreground of the barn and sought to 
emphasize the contrast with the cold, wet snow. 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. W. E. PHELPS 



51 EGG SCALE 



ILLUSTRATED 



On a table in the center, a box of the kind in which baby 
chicks are transported is filled with eggs. In front of the box 
is the delicate egg scale of a pale blue cast. Below at the left, 
two crates with eggs which have already been weighed. The 
pale color of the eggs contrasts with the warm brown of their 
surroundings. 

Dry brush 

14% X iy% inches 

Date: June 1959 

The scale is Alvaro Olson's (see Alvaro's Hayrack, number 
43). The artist was intrigued by the fragile quality of the 
eggs' shells piled in the yellow box with its air-vents. The 











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47 




48 



49 













50 





51 



scene recalled to him a boyhood experience of watching his 
grandfather weigh eggs on a similar scale. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW VVYETH 



52 BLUE MEASURE 



Near the center lie some empty feed bags thrown over a 
low empty grayish barrel. Bits of straw cling to the bags. On 
top of them is a blue metal measure. The timbers of the 
barn are gray. Light comes in from the right at a sharp angle 
through a big, unseen, open door. 

Dry brush 

21V2 x 15 inches (sight) 

Date: August 1959 

The barn is Alvaro Olson's (see numbers 43 and 51 ) . 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



53 BEE-HIVE 

The bee-hive hangs from the branches of the beech tree, 
with a few bees coming and going and honeysuckle still 
around the comb. 

Pencil 

22Y2 X i2 3 /4 inches (sight) 

Date: October 1959 

The hive is the same one drawn again in Winter Bees (num- 
ber 54). 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



54 WINTER BEES illustrated 

A bee's honeycomb, in tones from pale gold to deep brown, 
is suspended from the bare branches of a beech tree at the 
left. At the right is a detailed study of a section of the tree's 
trunk in tones from pale yellow to silver. 

Dry brush on white paper 

21 x 27 inches (sight) 

Date: November 1959 

Exhibition: Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, i960 

Reproduced: Art in America, vol. l, no. 2, Summer 1962, in color, p. 39 (as 

Storing Up) 

The pencil drawing, number 53, preceded this. By the time 
the artist drew this, most of the bees had gone into the 
comb. The shadows are those of late afternoon. When 
Wyeth returned from Maine in the autumn to discover this 
honeycomb in his mother's woods, a few bees were still 
buzzing around. As the days grew shorter and the nights 
colder, fewer and fewer bees appeared. Then suddenly the 
cold became bitter and a light snow fell. He wondered if his 
bees would be alive. All was quiet— not a bee. Then he held 
his ear close to the comb and sure enough a faint buzzing 
came from deep within. The drawing was never completed 
because a possum or some other animal got to the comb and 
ate up the honey! 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



55 SLIPPERS 



ILLUSTRATED 



A pair of worn men's slippers dominates the lower half of 
the page. Above, beneath a shelf, hangs a pair of scissors. 




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Pencil 

2i lr 'ii; ' 13*%6 inches (sight) 
Signed in pencil at lower right: AW 
Date: November 1959 

The drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera painting 
That Gentleman, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts. Tom Clark 
(number 72) is "That Gentleman." Both slippers and scis- 
sors are included in the tempera painting, which was com- 
pleted April 28, 1960, its preparatory drawings having been 
begun November 15, 1959- 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



Dry brush 

13% X 2 2%6 inches 

Date: December 1959 

This is Brinton's Mill as it was when the Wyeths acquired 
it. The silo has now gone. The dry brush drawing was made 
in December from beyond the corral in the foreground 
in the late afternoon. The golden amber light, the damp, 
dark foreground, the deep shadows and the sudden flight of 
the pigeons in a straight line all appealed to the artist. The 
drawings 40, 41, and 42 were done in front of this mill be- 
fore Wyeth bought it. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



56 MILL BUILDINGS 



ILLUSTRATED 



In the middle distance, beyond a high fence of boards at 
the left and of slats at the right, stands a group of four build- 
ings, two with pitched roofs, with a silo glimpsed between 
them at the left and a house at the right. The bare branches 
of trees rise above and beyond the roofs. A flock of pigeons 
flies above the silo. Others are perched on the peak of the 
mill's roof. A low winter light comes from the left. 

Pencil 

15 X 2i lr /i(i inches (sight) 

Date: November 1959 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



57 THE MILL 



ILLUSTRATED ( COVER) 



The scene is the same as number 56, but viewed nearer to. 
The pigeons here are flying across the center. 



58 BELOW THE KITCHEN 



ILLUSTRATED 



A ham and some bacon are hung from a nail in a beam. Be- 
low them, beneath an arch, dark shadow; at the right, their 
shadows cast by the light from the left. 

Dry brush 

22Y4 x iyi/2 inches (sight) 

Signed at lower left: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: March i960 

Karl Kuerner smokes his own ham and bacon and then 
hangs it in his cellar where the artist saw it. The moist, red- 
dish ham, the fresh cut edges of the bacon, the leather 
thongs, the chimney arch in the cellar, the deep gold light 
striking the meat and the shadows it cast, the white wash 
peeling from the wooden beam, all fascinated the artist. 

LENT FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION 






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59 MILK CANS 



ILLUSTRATED 



Two milk cans, one of dark metal, the other a pale silvery 
tone, stand side by side in the center, the broad boards of a 
pig pen to their right. Kuerner's hill rises behind them, with 
snow in the ruts of the curving tracks, the field honey- 
colored. 

Drv brush 

135/16 X igi-y 16 inches (sight) 

Signed in ink at the lower right: A. Wyeth 

Date: March i960 

The morning was a very cold one. The scene was one of 
harmonies of honey and silver. So that he would remember 
the clarity of the morning light on the hill, the artist tried a 
few washes in the right foreground. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



60 MAY DAY 



ILLUSTRATED 



A line of Spring Beauties at the edge of a gray bank, beyond 
them the water of the mill's raceway. 

Dry brush on white paper 
12% X 29 inches (sight) 
Date: May 1, i960 

Exhibitions: Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, i960; Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., i960, no. 40; Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, Society of the Fine Arts, 1961 

Reproduced: Art in America, vol. l, no. 2, Summer 1962, on the cover in 
color 

The picture has been cut down at the top to give it the 
present friezelike proportions. The silver maple and dried 



beech leaves were pushed aside in the spongy, wet spring 
earth by the Spring Beauties which blossomed near the dark 
water, some of them opening to the morning light as the 
artist, lying prone on his stomach, sketched their fragile, 
luminous shapes, delighted by the sparkle of their bright 
forms against the damp wetness around them. They grew 
along the mill race on his property. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



61 GERANIUMS 



The scene is the same as number 63, but with the focus on 
the window. The sun falls on the red geraniums against the 
far window. The distant blue sea is seen with the dark spruce 
branches outlined against it. Beyond the foreground window 
a white cloth covers the dishes. Christina Olson sits at the 
left between the table and the far window. 

Dry brush 

21 X 15% inches 

Signed at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: June i960 

The day was clear, summer blue. Although the house is 
weather-beaten, there is a joyous sparkle to the air brought 
out by the bright blooms on the geraniums. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



62 VINAL'S POINT 

A study of a long leg and a long-fingered hand, and a head 
and shoulders seen from the back. 



60 




Ebony pencil 

13% X 20 V2 inches (sight) 

Date: July i960 

The drawing is a preparatory study for Above the Narrows 
in the Collection of Mr. Jack J. Dreyfus, Jr., New York City 
(reproduced in color: Horizon, vol. iv, no. 1, page 93, as 
Nicky, i960) . The model was the Wyeths' elder son, Nicho- 
las. The tempera was completed by September 22, i960, 
while its preparatory drawings were begun July 12, i960. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



63 NEW ENGLAND 

At the left, above a single granite slab and two wooden 
steps, a door with a white doorknob opens into an empty 
hall. The storm door is open against the outer wall at 
the left. Through the single twelve-paned window in the 
weather-beaten wall a little right of center and beyond some 
bowls standing on a table and covered with a cloth, there is 
seen the back of the head and the shoulders of a woman 
wearing a blue and white striped blouse. She leans her head 
against her right hand and seems to be reading. She faces 
another window beyond which are the branches of an ever- 
green tree, dark against a pale sky. In the foreground, a wind 
from the right is blowing the tall, dry grass. 

Dry brush 

17% x 22 Vz inches 

Signed at lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: September i960 



The figure is Christina Olson (number 3). This is the 
kitchen ell of her house, which you can see in numbers 4 and 
61. Autumn has come bringing changeable weather and 
heavy sea fogs. 



LENT BY MR. T. EDWARD HANLEY 



64 STUDY FOR "YOUNG BULL" 



ILLUSTRATED 



Two quick sketches, one in pencil at left center, and one in 
wash above at right, of house and wall. To the left, two 
sketches of the young bull, standing with head turned sharp 
left. 



Pencil and water color 
14 X 16V2 inches 
Date: November i960 



A quick sketch of Karl Kuerner's house and wall, showing 
strong contrasts of light and shadow. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



65 STUDY FOR "YOUNG BULL" 

A pencil sketch which includes an indication of Karl Kuer- 
ner at the left with the young bull. 

Pencil 

11 X i6V4 inches (sight) 

Date: November i960 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



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66 STUDY FOR "YOUNG BULL" 

Watercolor 

13 X 16V4 inches (sight) 

Date: November 1960 

It is not usual for Wyeth to make so many preparatory 
studies for a dry brush drawing as he has in the case of the 
Young Bull (see also numbers 64 and 65). Here the hill is 
olive -green, the wall gray. These colors faded as the winter 
came on, so that in the dry brush drawing (number 67) 
they are muted. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



67 YOUNG BULL 



ILLUSTRATED 



The young bull stands facing the early morning light, sil- 
houetted against a stone wall which is still in shadow where 
he stands. In the left background, above the square pillar of 
the stone wall which supports a primitive wire gate, is a 
large rectangular white house, its upper story catching the 
morning sun. Above the wall, just behind the young bull, 
the bare branches of a low tree or shrub are silhouetted 
against the sky and the gentle rise of a barren hill. 

Dry brush in gray, yellow, white, brown, and green 

19% X <\\Vs inches 

Signed in ink at the lower right: Andrew Wyeth 

Date: Worked on through November until December 20, i960 

The house is Karl Kuerner's (see number 37) and the hill is 
the same shown in number 2. While Wyeth was working on 
the dry brush, the bull suddenly kicked the artist's palette. 



Color went flying! A splash of it can be seen 011 the bull's 
hind quarters. It resulted in one of those "happy accidents" 
that the artist decided to leave. 



LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



68 HANGING DEER 



ILLUSTRAII I) 



The dead deer, a rope around his neck, hangs from a bare 
branch of a willow tree. The shadow of the tree falls at an 
angle across the snowy foreground. 

Dry brush in brown, gray, and white, with a touch of strawberry red 
2ii% 6 x 13% inches 
Date: January 1961 

This drawing is a preliminary study for the tempera paint- 
ing Tenant Farmer in the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. 
Phelps, Montchanin, Delaware (reproduced in color: Hori- 
zon, vol. iv, no. 1, pp. 90-91). Wyeth, in the Horizon 
article, tells how he happened to see the deer hanging from 
the tree in the snow and how the subject haunted him until 
it became a symbol to him. "Finally," he says, "I had to do 
the painting just to get it out of my mind." The bare 
branches of the willow tree evoked in the artist the memory 
of early tombstones. He remembers, too, that its branches 
crackled in the wind as he made the drawing, adding to the 
eeriness of the occasion. The tempera was completed by 
April 1, 1961. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYE 1 11 




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69 BRICK HOUSE 

At the left is a bare willow tree (see number 68) . The brick 
house has a big chimney above its pitched roof. Snow is 
blowing off the eaves and there is an effect of deep snow 
around the house. An icicle hangs from the little porch at 
the left. The shed behind the house is indicated at the right. 

Dry brush in red, brown, and gray 
i3 1 /2 x 21 inches (sight) 
Date: January 1961 

The brick house is one of the early ones in the Chadds Ford 
region and is said to date back to William Penn's time. The 
drawing is a preparatory study for the tempera painting 
Tenant Farmer (see also number 68) . 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



70 JOHN 

The sitter is seen, head and shoulders, in profile toward the 
left. He has olive skin and almost crow-black hair, graying a 
little at the edges. He wears a tan jacket over an olive-green 
sweater. The background is warm gray. 

Dry brush 

1 1 l A x 1 5 14 inches 

Date: Late April 1961 

The drawing represents John McCoy, the brother-in-law of 
the artist. 

LENT BY MR. AND MRS. GEORGE WEYMOUTH 



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68 




71 



71 SLEEP 



ILLUSTRATED 



Wearing a white shirt with embroidery edged collar and 
cuffs and long gray trousers, the figure is on her back at a 
gentle diagonal from near the lower left to near the upper 
right. Her right hand holds three small fingers of her left 
hand, her eyes are closed, her head turned slightly inward. 
Two berry boxes, partially filled, lie in the grass in the fore- 
ground. A large chocolate-brown felt hat lies at her side. A 
single flowering stalk of meadowsweet blows above her 
face; the upper grass is deep in shadow across the top in a 
line parallel with the figure. 

Dry brush in many colors 

20% x 28% inches 

Date: July 1961 

Reproduced: Art in America, vol. l, no. 2, Summer 1962, in color, p. 40 

The drawing, which shows Mrs. Wyeth asleep, is a prepara- 
tory study for the tempera painting Distant Thunder, Col- 
lection of Mrs. Norman Woolworth, Winthrop, Maine. 
Rattler, the Wyeths' dog, appears in the painting. While 
Mrs. Wyeth slept, he lifted his head and put up his ears, 
listening to the distant thunder. The drawings were begun 
July 1, 1961 and the tempera completed October 1, 1961. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



72 GARRET ROOM 

A thin, aged Negro lies resting in a garret room on a silk 
patchwork quilt, his pillow an old sugar bag. Behind him 



the wall is blue. A white cloth hangs above his head. An 
apple basket is on the chair, which holds a shirt. 

Dry brush in many colors 

17V2 X 22V2 inches (sight) 

Date: December 1961-January 1962 

The sleeping man is Tom Clark (see numbers 49 and 55) 
who has posed many times for Wyeth. The silk patchwork 
was made by Tom Clark's grandmother. 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 



73 THE GRANARY 



ILLUSTRATED 



Two simple stone buildings, gray-brown in tone, the larger 
one at the left, dominate the middle distance. A third one is 
visible at the extreme right. The far bank of the mill race is 
visible at the extreme left with woods beyond. Snow covers 
the roofs and the wood pile at the right and snow flurries fill 
the air. There are three pigeons on the chimney of the mill 
building and three more on the cover of the hoist. 

Dry brush on heavy white paper 

13% X 21% inches 

Date: February 1962 

Reproduced: Art in America, vol. l, no. 2, Summer 1962, in color, p. 48 (as 

Brinton 's Mill) 

The building in the foreground is where the Wyeths live. 
The mill to the left dates back to the early 1700's. Out of 
view is the mill house (see numbers 56 and 57) . 

LENT BY MRS. ANDREW WYETH 




73 



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